Wednesday, March 18, 2020

The Heart of Christianity in a Time of Change

The Heart of Christianity in a Time of Change For many years the question of â€Å"what is the heart of Christianity?† has lingered in the minds of many believers. This has led to new ways of seeing Christianity and what it means to be a Christian to emerge. These new ways of understanding Christianity differ from the dominant way that has been in existence for many years, this means that Christianity is in a time of conflict.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on The Heart of Christianity in a Time of Change specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More This has led to the emergence of two paradigms on how Christians see the Bible, God, Jesus, faith, and the Christian life. According to the earlier paradigm, the bible is a divine book; it is the â€Å"Word of God† (Borg 7). This paradigm has over the years become less compelling. There is no doubt that it nourished the lives of many a fact that the author believes that it was the spirit of God working through it. Th e emerging paradigm on the other hand sees Christian life as â€Å"a historical, metaphorical, and sacramental way of seeing the bible† (Borg 13). It sees Christian life in a different perspective. According to it, Christianity entails a life of relationship and transformation that one does not need to believe in Christianity in order to be a Christian but rather, one should relate with God well in order to change the current circumstances. These two paradigms are usually suspicious of each other. The earlier paradigm sees the emerging paradigm as a reduction of Christianity where as the emerging paradigm sees the earlier paradigm as anti-intellectual and selectively moralistic (Borg 15). They both agree on the common focus of the bible and Jesus, and how Jesus plays a central role in mediating man to God. Many see the earlier paradigm as being static, an obstacle and therefore feel that their relationship with the Supreme can be nourished in a different way. The most importa nt aspect here is functionality, if a paradigm works for you, well and good, it does not mean it is the only right way (Borg 18). Making the Connection among Liberation Theologies around the World We learn from this book that liberation theologies in the world do not share a single perspective; each theology has its own distinctive view point. For instance, the past two decades have seen emergence of views in the Christian cycles. People around the world have risen against the social, economic, political, and religious structures that exist. These groups began new Christian practices and new ways of being the church. They led to the birth of new theologians with the knowledge in the life and practice of their groups. The book tries to show that all theologies are contextual and therefore, have limits, just like Anna Karenina put it, â€Å"each society, like each family, is unhappy in its own way† (Engel Brooks 3).Advertising Looking for essay on religion theology? L et's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Theologies cannot be heaped together because they are not interchangeable. They all have their own unique interests, viewpoints, aims as dictated by the society they exist in. This book depicts theologians as voices responding to and accountable to their groups and their context. Contextuality can be understood as one’s shared location. Each location has its norms. Michel Foucault wrote that â€Å"Each society has a regime of truth, its ‘general politics’ of truth† (Engel Brooks 6). This means that truth is a function of what a particular society accepts to be true. Liberation theologies do not split faith and life, theology and politics, and do not impose abstract principles upon the life of faith. They aim at social transformation towards greater justice for all people. They also work towards the empowerment of individuals. We also see that these theologies exist i n suspicion of each other. Each sees others as furthering the dominant mode of oppression. They therefore call for the liberation of Christian theology from concepts and structures that are oppressive (Engel Brooks 9). Faith Seeking Understanding: Chapter 1 The author of this book stresses that asking question is the nature of human beings and to be Christian entails asking tough questions in the light of the grace of God in his son Jesus Christ. He asserts that theology is not just the repetition of church doctrines nor ostentatious system building, but it is about faith asking questions and seeking their understanding. Faith and inquiry cannot therefore be separated. The freedom and responsibility of Christians to inquire about their faith in God is the mother of theology. Theology is a continual process because questions are asked over and over (Migliore 12). The author also argues that just like faith, theology is not a bundle of doctrines and symbols from which people can sele ct at will and organize them as they wish. Christian theology has doctrines that form a coherent whole. Theology teaches that every disturbed ear should be listened to. Today’s needs call for Christians to faithfully serve the gospel instead of endorsing the cultural forms in which it is mediated uncritically. He reiterates that today’s theology calls for thinking through and living out the faith as it relates to new experiences, problems and possibilities. I agree with Migliore that despite the difficult task of theology, there is no escaping the questions about the wholeness, the truth, the intelligibility, and the concrete practice of the gospel (Migliore 19).Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on The Heart of Christianity in a Time of Change specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Catholicism: Faith, Theology and Belief The author begins with a brief description of the problem that is brought about by the failu re of many Catholics to understand the differences among faith, theology and belief. These are identified as the elements of the problem. The first element is faith, which is defined as the personal knowledge of God. It is not primarily the belief in revealed truths to humans by God through the bible and the church, but it is how people come to know God as God. The second element is theology which has been defined as the process by which Christians bring their knowledge and understanding of God to the level of expression. The third element is belief. This is something that is accepted to be true without evidence. It is therefore a formulation of the knowledge that Christians have of God through faith. The final element discussed is religious education. Religious education helps individuals understand, respond and be transformed by God’s presence in their lives and work towards the continued transformation of the world in respect to the understanding of God (McBrien 24). This text shows that teaching religion is not just about the faith as it is done by Catholics, but should also allow for the teaching of modern theologies. We have just seen that the four elements relate to each other and therefore must be incorporated in religious teaching in order to dispel the misunderstandings in the Christian realm. The â€Å"Why and the what of Christians feminist theology† Many questions arise from this book in relation to the humanity of women. This brought out by Christine de Pizan who was concerned with women’s humanity because being male was equated to being human. Women were seen as lesser beings. Using her book, â€Å"the book of the city of ladies†, Pizan argues that women are human just like men and therefore do not need guidance and protection from men. She goes on to say that if given a chance, women can perform better just as men. She was so concerned with this issue to the extent that she never used the word feminism in her work un til the 19th century. It was in 1882 by Auclert to depict the struggle for women to get political rights. In the same century, female organizations emerged. They started speaking publicly about this issue in churches. These efforts saw many countries attain rights for women such as New Zealand, Finland, and eventually Russia, Canada and Great Britain in the 20th century (Clifford 1).Advertising Looking for essay on religion theology? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More These continued in the 19th century in the US where women were seen as subordinates and dependent on their male counterparts. Men exercised sovereignty in many areas. Women on the other hand were morally superior but seen to delicate to actively participate in public affairs. Feminist movement emerged to fight oppression discrimination and violence against women and for equality and dignity. There also emerged the second wave feminists. These included the liberal feminists, who fought for the civil rights for women, cultural feminists who emphasized the moral superiority of women, radical feminists who sought to eradicate patriarchy, and finally, the socialist feminists who fought to end economic dependence of women upon men. The book ended by looking at the types of feminist theology (Clifford 1). Experience, Knowledge, and Wisdom According to Ford, there is no distinct way of understanding and knowing theology. To experience, understand, and know theology needs wisdom which helps in shaping life and making it sensible despite its diversity, fragmentation, and also the fragility of beauty, truth, and goodness. He shows that theology is all about the world, the self and the language, elements that are in an endless interplay. He has discussed about epistemology, a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of knowing. Topics discussed here included extreme objectivism, extreme subjectivism, and the view of the world as a construct of languages (Ford 1). Through this book we get to understand why theology fails. The author has shown that oversimplified and inappropriate conceptions make theology to suffer. To truly understand and know God, Christians need unwavering wisdom. Because theology is all about questions, the type of questions will show an individual’s valid interest in the particular subject. To answer these questions requires valid methods of knowing to serve the particular interest. First people have to understand that knowledge is both soc ial and individual. Individually, every person experiences understanding and judging. Socially, individuals have to appreciate other people’s experiences, understandings, and judgments. Knowledge can be instantaneous but mostly it takes time. Humans use their knowledge and language to construct reality. This is what theology is all about. And if humans understand that things can go wrong then there is nothing wrong with improvements because knowledge keeps on growing (Ford 1). Genesis 1-3 This text shows God as an interactive being with already existing creatures. This is what theology is all about, interaction, coexistence with others in the understanding of God’s word. There is also the issue of knowledge, the humans ate from it and committed sin. Knowledge is the ability to discern good and bad. The response from God is not a punishment but consequences that reflect the time and context in which they existed. Adam sees everything to be fine but he has no one of his kind, he is lonely until a woman (Eve) was created. This is how important women are in the society. They should be treated equally and given equal opportunity with men because they are all equal in the eyes of God (Genesis 1). An introduction to the Bible: A journey into three worlds In this text we learn that the bible is a collection of books, which did not attain authority at one time. They were accepted through canonization that happened in three stages as revealed by the tree divisions of the canon. These were the Torah, the Prophets, and the writings. This text agrees that Christianity is centered in the bible and that it is undergoing changes as seen in the two paradigms. It says that the bible is historical, metaphorical and sacramental (Hauer Young 1). Feminist perspectives on the bible For a long time the bible has been a point of contention when it comes to the place of the woman in society. It is such issues that saw the emergence of feminist movement like the one initi ated by Stanton â€Å"The woman’s bible project†. Women came up with the idea that if men could revise the bible, why not them? This book talks about women and the bible trying to bring out their perspectives. It tries to find out why the knowledge of biblical women is so scanty. It sees the patriarchal attitudes of men as the cause of the neglect of women in liturgical readings and religious instructions. This is why feminist biblical scholars like Stanton embarked on biblical research to change it. I think these women were justified to fight for their right because scripture teaches that all are equal in the eyes of god (Clifford 66). Comparison of the Various Authors Borg in his book, â€Å"The heart of Christianity in a time of change† says that Christianity has gone through changes, which he puts into two paradigms. Engel and Brooks in their book, â€Å"Making the Connection among Liberation Theologies around the world† tells us that because Christia nity involves asking endless questions, there has emerged many theologies. These authors agree that there is no single paradigm or theology that is better than the other; they all work for the best of each group that is using it. Migliore, in the book, â€Å"Faith seeking understanding† agrees with Brook and Engel that theology is about asking questions. He also believes that Christians should be given a chance to inquire about their faith. These sentiments are also echoed but Ford in the book, â€Å"Experience, Knowledge, and Wisdom†. McBrien in his book, â€Å"Catholicism: Faith, Theology and Belief†, argues that Christians should have faith, which is the knowledge of God. Then they should be able to express their knowledge of God to others. He agrees with Migliore up to this point that faith and theology are inseparable, but differs with the others on the issue of belief. Belief entails accepting something without evidence, but others think that Christianity should be a way of life, a continual process of inquiry to gain knowledge and understanding of one’s faith. Clifford in the â€Å"Why and the What of Christian feminist theology† talks about women and Christianity, he shows how women reformation has come about over the years. He argues that women are equal to men in the eyes of God, sentiments that he also brings out in the book, Feminist perspectives on the bible. In think that Christianity should not be about faith, believing the teaching, traditions and systems put in place to be true without question as some Christians do. I agree with some of the authors that Christianity should be a way of life, a continual process of inquiry into one’s faith to get a better understanding of the Christian teachings. This is because the world is not static, it involves events and situations that keep on changing and their Christians should embrace the changes by accepting the different theologies depending on the situation and context they are in. am also a strong believer in equal opportunity for all and therefore everyone including women should be allowed to participate in the Christian way of life in all spheres. Borg, Marcus. The Heart of Christianity in a Time of Change. Clifford, Anne M. Introducing Feminist Theology. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2001. Print. Clifford, Anne. Feminist Perspectives on the Bible. Engel, Potter and Brooks Susan. Introduction: Making the Connections among Liberation Theologies Around the World. Ford, David. Experiment, knowledge, and wisdom. Genesis. The Creation of the world n.d. Web. https://www.esv.org/Genesis+1/ Hauer, Christian and Young, William. An introduction to the Bible and Journey into three worlds. McBrien, Richard. Catholicism. Migliore, Daniel. Faith seeking understanding: an introduction to Christian theology. New York: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004. Print.

Monday, March 2, 2020

How to Craft a Perfect Customer Service Resume Using Examples

How to Craft a Perfect Customer Service Resume  Using Examples If you’re looking to break into the customer service/call center world, or are already there and want to improve your chances at a promotion or a new opportunity, you probably already know that a great resume is the place to start. If you are looking to work in retail specifically, we have also created a comprehensive guide on how to write a retail resume. Let’s dive in and look at sample customer service resumes from three customer service professionals at different stages: one entry level, one looking to get a new job at a different company, and one looking to get promoted from within. 1. Entry Level Customer Service Resume2. Customer Service Resume for Managers3. Customer Service Resume for Executives   Entry Level Customer Service ResumeUp first: Marjorie, looking for her first fulls)How to Write a Perfect Occupational Therapist ResumeHow to Write a Perfect Physician Assistant Resume (Examples Included)How to Write a Perfect Receptionist Resume (Examples Included) How to Create a Perfect Retail ResumeHow to Write a Perfect Sales Associate Resume (Examples Included)How to Write a Perfect Social Worker Resume (Examples Included)How to Write a Perfect Truck Driver Resume (With Examples)

Friday, February 14, 2020

Nightingale's Nursing Theory Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Nightingale's Nursing Theory - Essay Example Her work and contribution to the nursing profession and medical care started thereof. As a reformist and a nurse, she became active in reforming the laws for the poor and was adamant in changing the conditions of the abysmal infirmaries or hospitals of that time. Among her most famous contribution was at the Crimean War. Ford (n.d.) discloses that Nightingale together with a group of nurses headed on to Turkey to help in the terrible conditions of the wounded British soldiers. With Nightingale's leadership, the nurses worked relentlessly to improve the living conditions of the wounded soldiers. It was in that same time that she was famously dubbed as "The Lady with the Lamp" by the British soldiers as she worked day in and day out to help them. She was also the first person to use statistics in the medical studies such as the high child mortality of those times. Nursing theories are the concepts and theories behind the nursing practice. Technically, Florence Nightingale never constructed a nursing theory, but her works and journals during her lifetime were treated by her predecessors as such. Her contemplations and deliberations on the apt standards of nursing were exquisitely described in her work entitled "Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not." Here, Nightingale's (1860) theory on nursing evolves around the concept that the patient's recovery is highly related to the conditions of his environment. The environment of a patient has a direct effect on his recovery or his deterioration. According to Nightingale, "Nature alone cures." With that she stresses on the healing properties of the physical environment of the patient; fresh air, light, warmth, cleanliness and a suitable diet. The environment not only refers to the physical aspect but also to the psychological and social environment surrounding the patient. Healthy communication with the patient and healthy environment keeps the patient's mind active and stimulated. Here Nightingale stresses that communication should be soothing and a form of therapeutic aid to the patient's suffering. How the nurses interact with the patient, may it be verbally or non-verbally also plays a role in the patient's recovery. They were to give comfort and ease the patient's suffering. She adds that there is a need for social awareness or social education on the disease of the patient, his family or the immediate people of that environment. The primary purpose of Florence Nightingale's nursing theory is to give nursing professionals indications on how to be effective in their chosen career. That is, nurses are there to control the environment and give the patients their basic needs to aid patients in their healing process and achieving their former strength. Nurses are not only to be focused on controlling the environment for the patient, but also in disseminating helpful information about the important aspects of the disease to the patient, the family and immediate community. Within Nightingale's nursing theory are the assumptions that are significant to applying the theory. First and foremost, Nightingale stresses on the need to understand that a disease is a reparative process. An inflicted goes through the natural healing process and those sufferings are indications of the body healing itself. The patient then

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Critical analysis of clinical management plan (CMP) Essay

Critical analysis of clinical management plan (CMP) - Essay Example Typically, following the discussion of the clinical management plan, it is expected that either the independent or supplementary prescriber can write a copy of a plan prior to the beginning of a supplementary process. Additionally, Tomar (2008, 274) accentuates that a supplementary prescriber should take the responsibility of assessing and overseeing the treatment plan in line with the information provided on the clinical management plan; this include prescribing a drug among the drugs that are stated in the clinical management plan. This report is set to analyze critically a clinical management plan with respect to a patient that was initially prescribed the intravenous caomoxiclav after experiencing a dog’s bite; this was followed by a prescription of an oral coamoxicla after the supplementary prescriber found out that the condition had improved. A patient was bitten by a dog, and sustained minor injuries. However, after three days, the patient presented a sustained a punctured wound on the right forearm for a minor injury to the Accident and Emergency department. The wound was associated with a swelling, redness and pain. A diagnosis of the condition revealed that the patient was infected with cellulitis (Allan, Atkinson and Agada, 2013, p.1159). Although a dog bite is normally treated with oral coamoxiclav, the delay in presentation to a minor injury led the independent prescriber to prescribe an intravenous coamoxiclav antibiotic, as well as put lined mark on the redness with a recommendation to return for a review the following day (Asherson, 2011). However, the condition of the patient improved given that the redness and swelling reduced notably; the patient was directed to switch from the intravenous coamoxiclav antibiotic to an oral antibiotic. The patient is a female and office clerk of 30 years. Historically, the pa tient described that he is

Friday, January 24, 2020

A Comparison of Hawthornes Scarlet Letter and the Garden of Eden Essay

Parallels Between The Scarlet Letter and the Garden of Eden      Ã‚  Ã‚   In Hawthorne's intricately woven tale The Scarlet Letter, his characters create a parallel theme with the Biblical story of Original Sin. By examining the characters and their interactions and insights about each other, one can examine the symbolic parallels with the Garden of Eden.    One aspect of the Garden of Eden theme is portrayed by the connection of Hester and Dimmesdale. Hester's story parallels Eve, the original mother of mankind, a woman exiled from the New Garden of Eden due to an unforgivable sin. She is doomed forever to walk outside the garden, no longer able to partake of the fruits of paradise, barred from reentry by seeming "divine intervention." Hester is the temptress of Dimmesdale, offering him the fruit of good and evil which, heretofore, removes all naivete and forces him to walk, tortured, through the world with the knowledge of right, wrong, and the magnitude of his sin seeming to accost him at each new turn of the dim path down which he walks.    Dimmesdale is a fallen hero, one of God's chosen, who has fallen from grace in the moment of his original sin. He, also, is excluded form society because once his eyes are opened with the knowledge of good and evil, he cannot remain a true member of the blind, child-like Puritan society. Instead of leading the life of brilliance one would expect to arise from Dimmesdale's profound faith, he is ever tortured by his two-faced appearance. He imagines, "A herd of diabolic shapes grinned and mocked at the pale minister, and beckoned him away with them" (Hawthorne 141). Thus, Dimmesdale provides his own character insight as he examines his divided character and his appearance. He re... ...ne 168). Thus, Chillingworth handsomely finishes the parallel of Original Sin, ensconcing himself in darkness and malevolent desires.    By examining thematic links to the story of the downfall of man, one can trace a new level of character insight. One examines the role of Adam, Eve, and the Devil in the New Garden of Eden, following their sin and exile closely in the characters of Hester, Dimmesdale, and Chillingworth.    Works Cited and Consulted: Canby, Henry S. "A Skeptic Incompatible with His Time and His Past." Readings on Nathaniel Hawthorne (pp. 55- 63). San Diego: Greenhaven. 1996. Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter. New York: St. Martins, 1991. Scharnhorst, Gary. The Critical Response to Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. New York: Greenwood, 1992. The Holy Bible. KJV. Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville. 1984. A Comparison of Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter and the Garden of Eden Essay Parallels Between The Scarlet Letter and the Garden of Eden      Ã‚  Ã‚   In Hawthorne's intricately woven tale The Scarlet Letter, his characters create a parallel theme with the Biblical story of Original Sin. By examining the characters and their interactions and insights about each other, one can examine the symbolic parallels with the Garden of Eden.    One aspect of the Garden of Eden theme is portrayed by the connection of Hester and Dimmesdale. Hester's story parallels Eve, the original mother of mankind, a woman exiled from the New Garden of Eden due to an unforgivable sin. She is doomed forever to walk outside the garden, no longer able to partake of the fruits of paradise, barred from reentry by seeming "divine intervention." Hester is the temptress of Dimmesdale, offering him the fruit of good and evil which, heretofore, removes all naivete and forces him to walk, tortured, through the world with the knowledge of right, wrong, and the magnitude of his sin seeming to accost him at each new turn of the dim path down which he walks.    Dimmesdale is a fallen hero, one of God's chosen, who has fallen from grace in the moment of his original sin. He, also, is excluded form society because once his eyes are opened with the knowledge of good and evil, he cannot remain a true member of the blind, child-like Puritan society. Instead of leading the life of brilliance one would expect to arise from Dimmesdale's profound faith, he is ever tortured by his two-faced appearance. He imagines, "A herd of diabolic shapes grinned and mocked at the pale minister, and beckoned him away with them" (Hawthorne 141). Thus, Dimmesdale provides his own character insight as he examines his divided character and his appearance. He re... ...ne 168). Thus, Chillingworth handsomely finishes the parallel of Original Sin, ensconcing himself in darkness and malevolent desires.    By examining thematic links to the story of the downfall of man, one can trace a new level of character insight. One examines the role of Adam, Eve, and the Devil in the New Garden of Eden, following their sin and exile closely in the characters of Hester, Dimmesdale, and Chillingworth.    Works Cited and Consulted: Canby, Henry S. "A Skeptic Incompatible with His Time and His Past." Readings on Nathaniel Hawthorne (pp. 55- 63). San Diego: Greenhaven. 1996. Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter. New York: St. Martins, 1991. Scharnhorst, Gary. The Critical Response to Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. New York: Greenwood, 1992. The Holy Bible. KJV. Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville. 1984.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Birth Control for Teenagers

The term birth control is generally defined as the â€Å"deliberate prevention of pregnancy using any of several methods† (â€Å"Birth Control†). It is sometimes referred to as contraception (â€Å"Birth Control†). A deeper view of the term would reveal that it ranges from the most popular, which is the pills, up to the traditional, which is the method of abstinence (Avert. org). Its definition alone does not prescribe anything about the age group as to whom this should be administered. Recent studies would place better light on the administration of birth control for teenagers as early as their age and the benefits would bounce back on to them.Likewise, the purpose of birth control is not the prevention of pregnancy alone but also includes health safety reasons and for medical purposes. It serves as a means of preventing the spread of HIV diseases among teenagers who are especially at risk for unprotected sexual intercourse. Moreover, pills, as one of the method s for birth control, are sometimes prescribed by doctors for â€Å"medical reasons, such as excessively heavy periods, severe menstrual cramps, or acne† (Greenfield).These purposes stated above places birth control means with a lot of uses and does not solely mean the prevention of pregnancy, as it is commonly referred to. The benefits of providing birth control for teenagers exceed the moral speculations attached to it. The speculations and allegations of the harm that birth control would bring would certainly place the teenagers at a very disadvantaged position. A primary benefit of birth control being given to teenagers is that it would increase their awareness at a very early age.Awareness of the birth control methods through proper education is not a means of preparing them to have sex. Rather, it is a means of preparing them to live healthy and responsible teenage lives. This would enable them to instill a sense of heightened awareness before they decide to engage in se x. The act of engaging into sexual intercourse by teenagers could not be avoided because of the stage of puberty they are going through. This is especially true with teenagers with teenagers with weak social support groups.Likewise, the awareness they receive at an early age would become a tool they could use to decide whether they would want to engage in sexual intercourse or not. With the use of the information they are properly provided, they would have the chance to enhance their decision-making skills and would give the chance to make informed decisions. In addition to an informed judgment, birth control would prevent unwanted pregnancies and would reduce the number of teenage parents. This would provide a great benefit for the USA in relation to the latest statistics on teenage pregnancies.According to the report, â€Å"The United States has the highest rates of teen pregnancy and births in the western industrialized world. Teen pregnancy costs the United States at least $9 b illion annually† (Teenpregnancy. org). With the alarming rate of teenage pregnancies today, it is best to mitigate the impact of such and help these teenagers as early as possible. It should be taken into account that the introduction of birth control to teenagers should be accompanied by several other factors for it to be considered as a successful one.First, it should have with it the proper information as stated earlier. Factors that should be considered when making the awareness campaign would have to be that it contains the proper use of such, its importance especially to the teenage group, the purpose behind it, and the persons or organizations to whom teenagers could talk to about this. It should be clearly shown that the purpose for giving them birth control is not to persuade them into having teenage sex. Rather, it is to prepare them and inform them about the risks and importance of planning for their future.Second, the important social support groups should constant ly give teenagers with advice with regard to sensitive issues related to birth control. They would serve as the ones who would reinforce the values laid down by proper information dissemination. Third, trust should be given by parents to their children when it comes to birth control. Along with trust should be the constant reminder of the things they need to do. More often than not, barriers to communication between the parents and the teenagers result to disagreements between the two and would even bring them dissatisfaction and rebellion.There is nothing wrong with teenagers receiving birth control especially so that abstinence is a form that is advocated by both religious and civic groups and is included in the list of birth control methods. This brings further light to the fact that birth control does not enhance the sexual activity of teenagers. Being the most vulnerable of them all, the opportunity to be protected, educated, and provided with birth control methods should never be taken away from them. It is a right which should be given to all women and men alike and to all age groups. Works Cited Avert. org.Birth Control and Contraception for Teenagers. 26 June 2007. Avert. 22 August 2008 [http://www. avert. org/cpills. htm]. â€Å"Birth Control. † In Microsoft ® Student 2007 [DVD]. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation, 2006. Greenfield, Marjorie. Myths and Realities about Giving the Pill to Preteens, Teens. 2 August 2008. The Dr. Spock Company. 22 August 2008 [http://www. drspock. com/article/0,1510,6127,00. html]. Teenpregnancy. org. General Facts and Stats. November 2006. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 22 August 2008 [http://www. teenpregnancy. org/resources/data/genlfact. asp].

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Summary Of Beethoven II - 2183 Words

XIAO ZHANG Final Project Brahms, IV. Adagio – Pià ¹ andante – Allegro non troppo, ma con brio – Pià ¹ allegro from Symphony No. 1 Part 1, Adagio, C minor m. 1 Protagonist 1 violin 1 and violin 2 and Antagonist 1 woodwind section comes in together continues to m. 5. Protagonist 1 melody is prominent because of orchestration Melody is fully harmonized like a chorale. Longest rhythm values and sequential. Antagonist 1 melody feels like very even with crescendo and diminuendo. The Harmony with C minor tonal center and plus the chromatic alteration. The melody goes down step by step and up with legato line. The rhythm is quarter note evenly moving down and up. . Musically this with very stronger character, using chromatic alterations against†¦show more content†¦Again, the notes figure and speeds up, much faster this time, as the passage is shorter than the first one. The keys that are now indicated after C minor are B-flat minor and the A-flat minor. The pizzicato is now cut off again after four bars. m. 22 The winds now use forward with the same thing, building very quickly in volume. There is syncopation in both winds and s trings. m. 24 Beginning in F minor, the strings now play a longer phrase of broken, fast moving down lines with light wind support. These lines diminish before an unexpected higher wave with brass and winds. They then drop and diminish again. Finally, the flutes, oboes, and bassoons begin to play a sad drop that will soon be tell as the stronger figure that will control the second part of the introduction. With the wonderful timpani roll, this even wave is unexpectedly cut off. The C-minor key is somewhat avoid at this point, but the low strings hold on, diminish, and drop, goes into the new tempo and C-major key for the introduction second part. Part 2, Pià ¹ Andante, C major m. 30 P1 horn part comes in continues to m. 37 than same thing the flute as a P1 comes in again continues to m. 46. This is very obvious P1 musically with very stronger character. C-Major chord. It is longest rhythm values. Sound is very powerful with F dynamic. After that, P2 tenor trombone and A2 bass trombone comes in continues to m. 61. This is a definitely new melody. Rhythm is half